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Seminar

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Judy Russell

2015 AGS Seminar
Austin Genealogical Society presents:
The Legal Genealogist
Judy G. Russell, JD, CGSM, CGLSM

May 30, 2015    9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Triumphant Love Lutheran Church
9508 Great Hills Trail    Austin, TX 78759
(Doors open at 8:00 a.m.)

The Legal Genealogist Judy G. Russell is a genealogist with a law degree. She writes and lectures on topics ranging from court records to DNA testing. A Colorado native with roots deep in Texas and the American south on her mother's side and in Germany on her father's side, she is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society and numerous state societies. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, from which she holds credentials as a Certified GenealogistSM and Certified Genealogical LecturerSM, and is on the faculty at several genealogical institutes.

Pre-registration is $35 for AGS member, $45 for non-members. Optional box lunch is $10.
You may also bring your own lunch. Light refreshments will be served in the morning.
COMPLIMENTARY BAGS AVAILABLE TO THE FIRST 100 REGISTRANTS
Registration at the door will be $45. For further info, contact seminar@austintxgensoc.org

Register by mailRegister by PayPal or Credit Card
Mailed registrations must be received by May 19, 2015 Online registration closes May 28, 2015

Seminar Topics

How Old Did He Have To Be…?
Is this man John the father or John the son? Could that man be my ancestor who married in 1802? Knowing a person’s age is often the key to distinguishing between two people of the same name. But if no record gives a birthdate, how do you know how old someone was? The law can often give the answer.

Where There Is – or Isn’t – a Will
Where there’s a will, there’s a probate. And often when there isn’t a will, there’s still a probate. Understanding the process and finding the records created when our ancestors died can help break through those brick walls.

Dowered or Bound Out: Records of Widows and Orphans
Widows and orphans have always had a special place in the law. But it’s not always the place that 21st century researchers might expect. An orphan in the early days wasn’t a child whose parents had died, but rather a child whose father had died. The law didn’t care much about the mother. She was just the widow, entitled to her dower rights and generally not much more. Learn more of the way the law treated widows and orphans, and what the records may tell us about them.

Blackguards and Black Sheep – The Lighter Side of the Law
No, actually, our ancestors didn’t behave any better back then than we do today, and the records they left behind documenting their missteps and misdeeds are among the priceless gems of genealogy.

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